Movie Review: Meet Me in St. Gallen Makes It Hurt So Good

TL;DR: Meet Me in St. Gallen is a wistful romantic comedy that’s not afraid to look at the cost of choices we make to become adults.

Celeste (Bela Padilla) is a graphic artist working under an abusive manager who dreams of becoming a successful artist. Jesse (Carlo Aquino) is a college student who moonlights as a frontman of a fledgling band without his parents’ approval. After he was caught by his parents performing at a concert, they scold him & demand that he finish his studies. He’s left feeling frustrated, but when he inadvertently listens to Celeste quitting her job over her boss’ unreasonable demands on the phone, he decides to follow her. Celeste notices & doesn’t take it lightly that someone is tailing her. But when she finds out that he’s a harmless man looking for someone to bond with his failing artistic ambitions, she calms down & they bond over the course of one night; talking about their childhood & the similarities of their name to the movie Celeste & Jesse Forever. Their lovely night is even capped off with a passionate kiss.

But Celeste decides it would be better not to ruin the moment & leaves Jesse without exchanging their personal details & promising not to add each other on Facebook. From there, Meet Me in St. Gallen becomes a wistful romantic comedy about chance encounters, missed opportunities, & the compromises we make as we find ourselves. It takes the “Before Sunrise” template – two people who found each other & slowly falling in love in the process – that’s been so popular nowadays & takes it even further, injecting it with a heavy dose of melancholy & pragmatism that’s comparable to the rest of the Before Trilogy. That makes it sound like a downer – and it is! – but it doesn’t lose the witty, captivating discussions & great performances that makes romantic two-handers like this so enjoyable. Bela Padilla is once again the blunt, guarded, yet compassionate artist full of ambition & resentment, similar to her role as Stella in 100 Tula ni Stella, but instead of Stella’s recklessness, she ingrains Celeste with maturity. Carlo Aquino is charming as the equally ambitious & friendly Jesse, whose pained expressions reveal the depth of his regrets in life. Both have a cackling chemistry that makes it easy to understand how quickly they’re pulled in each other’s orbit.

But that’s not enough to commit to a relationship. Meet Me in St. Gallen understands that the weight of all of our decisions in life will leave us reeling if we made the right choice, haunting us even as we’ve already carved a space for ourselves in the world. It doesn’t shy away from the realities of adulthood, even as it takes the form of a romantic comedy, which makes for a very satisfying watch. That’s why even as the movie presses on to its inevitable conclusion, it hurts so good.


Movie Review: Changing Partners Evokes Genuine Heartbreak Regardless of Gender

TL;DR: Changing Partners successfully transitions from the stage to the big screen, keeping its clever concept & wounded, beating heart intact.

Changing Partners tells the story of Alex & Cris. Alex is a middle-aged, ambitious, hardworking manager, while Cris is young, unemployed, & ambitious, who is trying to figure out what to do in life in between working through part-time jobs & side jobs. Both of them are in a loving May-December relationship & cohabitating, with Cris taking care of the house & Alex supporting both of them financially. It’s not a perfect union, though. Alex is jealous of Cris’ close friendship with Angel, while Cris can’t stand how controlling Alex is. Their problems slowly boil until it becomes inescapable.

However, this story isn’t told as plainly as possible. Based from a stage musical of the same name that had its successful run in the PETA Theater Center, Alex are both played by Agot Isidro & Jojit Lorenzo, & Cris are both played by Anna Luna & Sandino Martin, with Alex & Cris partnered with different performers in four different ways based on their gender: a cishet female Alex & a cishet male Cris, a cishet male Alex & a cishet female Cris, a cis gay Alex & a cis gay Cris, & a cis lesbian Alex & a cis lesbian Cris.


It’s a complicated conceit, & thankfully the movie slowly eases the audience in to avoid confusion, but once it does, it becomes a fascinating way to show how universal love is, & how their age & gender reveals the different power dynamics their relationship has & how it affects them. Alex & Cris clearly love & strengthen each other, but they have issues they need to address, which is often muddled by the age gap between them.

It helps that the transition from the stage to the big screen is seamless. The theatrical version has found a clever way to show the shift in perspectives – some of which you can view here – it feels much more at home in a movie, where a simple shot reverse shot could instantly change which couple we’re watching. The entirety of the whole movie is set in the confines of Alex’s house, yet it’s never claustrophobic. The camera follows their ordinary lives simply & unobtrusively, making it alive & grounded at the same time. The songs match the material’s tone, opting for a naturalistic lyrics & singing that makes it easier for their emotions to come across.


The main quartet of performers are the same people who acted in the stage version, & not only does it make the movie the easiest way to view the musical for those of us who missed out on its original run, but the actors already mastered the material. It really shows, with each of the actors & actresses delivering strong performances. The performances for each role are consistent as well, so it isn’t jarring when the movie shifts from one couple to another. Jojit Alonzo & Agot Isidro both show Alex’s jealousy & aggressive behavior without making them offputting, & Anna Luna & Sandino Martin reveal how lost Cris is in the relationship without making them pathetic. All of them display the flaws of two people who were never on the same footing in the first place.

Changing Partners reveals the universal truth that love has no boundaries. In the process of doing so, it shows the same can be said for heartbreak. Demonstrating this truth by using an ingenious conceit makes it easier to unveil its sincere, wounded heart.


Mr. & Mrs. Cruz & How We Define Happy Endings

Contains spoilers for Mr. & Mrs. Cruz. If you’re looking for a spoiler-free review, you can read it here.

Romantic comedies carry a lot of expectations about what kind of movies they’ll be. They will almost always feature two young, gorgeous people who, slowly but surely, will fall in love & get the happy ending they deserve; both of whom will presumably have a happy relationship once the credits roll. It’s a formula that works for a good reason: It’s fun, escapist, somewhat idealistic entertainment & there’s nothing wrong with that.

Mr. & Mrs. Cruz seems like it would be a traditional romantic comedy updated for current audiences. That’s not a problem, because it’s a masterful execution of the genre thanks to Sigrid Andrea Bernardo & the lovely performances from Ryza Cenon & JC Santos. But the movie has more in its mind, pushing beyond its initial premise that somehow makes it more human & fanciful at the same time.

Both Raffy (JC Santos) & Gela (Ryza Cenon) have valid reasons to get away from the city & take a tour of Palawan. Initially we’re only told that Raffy finds a letter from her fiance breaking off the engagement with the ring near it before the wedding, while Gela hugs her wedding dress, clearly dreading the idea of going through the wedding. But once they both start drinking at a bar after a day of bonding together, they finally share the reasons why they took their vacation. Raffy’s fiancee left him at the altar after being with him for three years, while Gela left his husband after they got married for three months; whom she’s been with for eight years. Raffy is still wounded by this, especially since he proposed to his fiancee on Palawan three years ago. Gela feels hurt & guilty for leaving her husband, who gave her everything she wanted when they were together for eight years; even if she needed to do so because she’s losing herself in their relationship.

Their drunken, hilarious, heart-to-heart talk helped them gain a mutual understanding on one’s heartbreak. Raffy now understands why her fiancee left, while he assures Gela that she did the right thing. This leads to the couple trying to make out while completely wasted on alcohol, which ends with Gela puking on Raffy, Gela trying to find Nemo of Finding Nemo in her vomit, & feeding some of it to Raffy, a disgusting but hilarious ending to their fun, heartfelt night.

After they’ve woken up & had a contentious misunderstanding about last night’s events, it’s clear that they’ve become even closer & more enamored of each other. They are freed from their issues thanks to one another. When they found out that the tour they joined left them, they decide to explore the sights of Palawan together. It even inspired Raffy to show Gela a video of his engagement from his ex-fiancee & delete it afterwards. Gela is shocked to find out that Gela & her ex-husband were also in Palawan back when they weren’t married when Raffy proposed to his ex-fiancee. She decides not to tell him, as they continue to enjoy each other’s company.

It’s at this point you’d expect the movie to end, with both of them presumably having a long, happy relationship after they leave the island. Why couldn’t it? They’re clearly in love, they comforted & supported each other, & the movie even implies that they’re destined to be together.

But Gela doesn’t want to pursue a relationship with Raffy. She thinks they’re both at different points in their life, & they need more time to find their place in the world. Even she finds their whole situation to be unreal, commenting that it’s something out of a romantic comedy. And she thinks they might see each other someday. Raffy asks her to reconsider & trade contact details, but she declines, leaving him alone in Palawan. After she left, Raffy finds her copy of Romeo & Juliet. He opens it & reads her parting message, with her incomplete cellphone number scribbled in the book’s first page. He also finds a picture of Gela, ripped from a photo taken by the newlywed couple who joined their tour.

It’s an ending that is at odds with itself, falling outside of the typical “happy ending” demanded by the genre while embracing the tropes of the genre. However, it makes complete sense. While their story has the makings of a fantastic romantic-comedy – and I’d agree because the movie is fantastic – they still have a lot to work on. Both of them still need to figure out what to do next; especially Gela, who’s trying to learn who she is after staying in a relationship for eight years. Staying together would worsen whatever hangups they have. Finding someone to love & reciprocates that feeling may be the usual conclusion we get in romantic comedies, but Mr. & Mrs. Cruz suggests that prioritizing our self-improvement is more important. Maybe after we find ourselves, it’ll be easier to find the “happy ending” we deserve.

Movie Review: Mr. & Mrs. Cruz is a Hilarious, Resonant Tale About Moving On

TL;DR: Mr. & Mrs. Cruz embraces the genre’s tropes & executes them masterfully, but it becomes more heartfelt once it leaves them behind.

It should be obvious from the trailers that Mr. & Mrs. Cruz is another hugot-infused “Before Sunrise” riff in a picturesque locale that’s sure to inspire lots of swooning romantics & broken-hearted cynics to go soul-searching on Palawan to find themselves. It’s a formula on the verge of becoming banal & repetitive, as numerous Filipino movies have used the template by the influential That Thing Called Tadhana (That Thing Called Destiny), but riffed on it in different ways. The latest movie from Sigrid Andrea Bernardo, the director of Ang Huling Cha-Cha ni Anita (Anita’s Last Cha-Cha) & the highest-grossing Filipino indie Kita Kita (I See You), might lean closer to the formula compared to others, but it’s done brilliantly, while coming up with its own ideas.

Gela Cruz (Ryza Cenon) & Raffy Cruz (JC Santos) are two tourists who went to Palawan in order to find themselves on their own after both experienced a wedding-related snafu. Neither of them have met before, but people keep confusing them for a married couple thanks to their similar, yet ridiculously common surname; including an old couple celebrating their golden anniversary & newlywed couple who are grouped with them in the tour. At first, they try their best to stick to their plans of enjoying this trip alone, but they easily hit it off; even if they had a huge fight about the importance of marriage. What they slowly realize is they each have something to impart that will help them move past their heartbreak.

What makes Mr. & Mrs. Cruz stand out from the rest is how it sharpens the film’s elements at its most effective. The movie mostly sticks with Gela & Raffy for the rest of the movie talking to each other, & it never grinds to a complete halt. Bernardo has always had a great ear for memorable dialogue & that quality shines through. The conversations Gela & Raffy have range from the silly, mundane, & hugot-related, but it’s always witty & engaging. They’ll be riffing on the implications of eating El Nido soup, how Romeo & Juliet isn’t aspirational once you look at it during adulthood, & their heated exchange about the need for marriage. Even those outside Gela & Raffy are amusing & memorable, giving the main couple a chance to interact with others. It isn’t above indulging in scenes outside its grounded tone if it will lead to something remarkable, including a funny gag involving dry-fit shorts & moments of whimsy that’s one of Bernardo’s trademarks. All of it is stirkingly shot, capturing how Gela & Raffy are slowly becoming closer to each other from the exquisite beaches of Palawan to its clean hotel rooms.

But the movie wouldn’t work without Ryza Cenon & JC Santos at its center. Their initial awkwardness quickly give way to a comfortable looseness they easily exude. It’s so enthralling to carry themselves well to Bernardo’s snappy dialogue. JC Santos is more aggressive & slightly reckless as Raffy, while Ryza Cenon is more composed as Gela, but willing to banter or fight back at Raffy’s repartee.

But starting from the night Raffy & Gela get drunk at a bar, it becomes clear Ryza Cenon is the instant standout. She becomes an emotional trainwreck as Raffy & Gela dig deeper about their issues. Cenon switches from laughing, drinking, crying, & laugh-crying while drinking, turning into a manifestation of a heartbroken id who drowns her sorrow with alcohol, but no matter how hard she tries, her broken heart always wins out; so she might as well have fun. JC Santos plays the much needed equally heartbroken, but more levelheaded drunken straight man, reacting to Gela’s ramblings while trying to make sure she’s safe. As they return to their hotel room, they reciprocate each others feelings in clumsy, awkward yet romantic fashion that inevitably turns into a literal mess.

Its heavy use of tropes appears to be purposeful though. Bernardo keeps propelling the narrative to something more emotionally true, even as it includes a twist that seems out of place. It’s a neat trick that makes it even more insightful & human. At the end, Mr. & Mrs. Cruz reveals what it truly is: a story of two people making sense of each other’s pain & sorrow. 

Movie Review: Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes is a Funny, Empathetic Beginner’s Guide to the LGBTQA+ Community

TL;DR: Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes (The Two Mrs. Reyes) turns a problematic premise into a funny, insightful look at sex, gender & the LGBTQA+community.

Filipino mainstream film studio Star Cinema’s first movie for 2018 – co-produced with Quantum Films & The IdeaFirst Company – has two cishet women receiving a crash course on the complexities of sex & gender in the worst way possible, after they found out their husbands are in a romantic relationship, bolting out of their lives & leaving them alone to pick up the pieces.

It’s not like their marriages were perfect to begin with. Lilian Reyes (Judy Ann Santos) is a successful owner of a plastic surgery clinic, who barely has any time with her husband Gary (Joross Gamboa) & her daughter Macy (Andrea Brillantes). She suspects Gary is cheating on her with a busty colleague, which pushes her to have breast implants. Cindy Reyes (Angelica Panganiban) is a loving wife who will do anything to please her husband Felix (JC de Vera). She also wants to be more sexually intimate with him, especally since her annoying mother-in-law (Carmi Martin) wants to have a grandson, but Felix rarely reciprocates her advances, spending more time with his cat rather with his wife.

So when both of their partners left without any warning, only to find out they’ve been in the closet for their entire lives, it was a devastating blow that left them reeling for answers. It took a while for them to talk to their husbands to clarify the situation or at least try to put things back to the way it used to be, but when they did, it got even more confusing for them. Gary is came out as a trans woman attracted to men, while Felix is heteroflexible cis man. They’re trying to take things in stride, but can’t get over the fact that they were cheated on, so what do they do: they’re going to split them up as a form of revenge before they get married in Taiwan.

It’s a very tricky premise that could easily go south, but director Jun Robles Lana handles it delicately. It’s not a surprise if you’re familiar with his work, since he’s directed a lot of classic queer Filipino films like Bwakaw & the surprise hit of Metro Manila Film Festival 2016 Die Beautiful; the latter of which is about the wake of a transgender woman & her friends trying their best to give her the funeral she wanted, while it flashes back from her complicated life to the grim present. But what he does here is nothing short of astounding. He lays out the nature of these two marriages, even before their husbands come out.

And once it does, the movie never turns the two Mr. Reyes into the butt of the jokes. They have a genuine relationship that is treated with utmost respect & nuance. It’s still chaste – which I assume is because our ratings board can be very harsh on queer movies – but it isn’t depicted as perfect either. They’re clearly in love but they have fights just like any other couple.

But the movie’s main focus is on our titular characters processing their unusual circumstances. They are at a loss as they are forced to understand the nuances gender identity & sexual orientation; especially once they start pulling off their plan to split them up. This might be the first Filipino fictional film to acknowledge the existence of other sexual orientations outside of gay & lesbian — such as pansexual & heteroflexible – & to mention LGBTQQIP2SAA with an explanation of what that means. They do mean well, even if they are don’t know what it means to be trans.

However, it also understands that they are coming from a place of sadness, confusion, & anger. It knows that their revenge, while juvenile & mean, is rooted in being shoved aside as their husbands form a new life without them. It even acknowledges how their duplicitous marriage is partly caused by a homophobic society that forces people to hide in the closet & lead unhappy, double lives to survive discrimination & violence. But it never loses sight of how horrible their plan is, especially once the two Mr. Reyes fears are suddenly realized.

Still, it doesn’t let the two Mr. Reyes get off the hook easily either. They did depart their wives without any proper explanation or time to process the news, & cheated on them, even if they aren’t heterosexual. That doesn’t mean they deserve hatred for coming out or because of their sexuality. They just completely mishandled the situation that left their wives wondering what went wrong.

What’s arresting is how Judy Ann Santos & Angelica Panganiban portray the complexity of what Lilian & Cindy go through with ease. Judy Ann Santos & Angelica Panganiban are great conspirators who find friendship through heartbreak. Panganiban is lively, snappy, & full of seething rage. Santos is less lively compared to Panganiban, despairing over the fact that an aspect of her life is now over, but she’s still capable of lashing out. Their different energies complement each other & it shows in their fast, comic banter.

And it is gut-bustingly hilarious! This is one of Star Cinema’s raunchier efforts – as raunchy one could get in the Philippines – yet it never relies on vulgarity alone. It is smart, silly, & at times slapstick, culminating in a memorable scene involving Lilian’s breast implants. Yet, it never loses sight of what all of them are going through.

That’s because Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes has huge empathy for all of its characters, even as it puts them through ridiculous situations. What’s impressive is it maintains a light comic touch even as it tackles the plight of the LGBTQQIP2SAA community through the eyes of two cishet females. As Lilian & Cindy learn, we should accept & allow them to live & love fully. Love is a beautiful thing that chooses no boundaries. Why bother getting in the way?

Movie Review: Mama’s Girl’s Sweetness Covers Up Its Flaws

TL;DR: Despite its fascinating structure, Mama’s Girl is deeply flawed, but the mother-daughter duo at its core makes up for it.

It’s so frustrating to watch a movie like Mama’s Girl. Its heart is in the right place, & has all the ingredients of an unforgettable movie that you can’t help but root for it to pull it off. However, the movie’s faults are hard to ignore, nearly overwhelming whatever merits it has in the first place.

Abby (Sofia Andres) is college graduate with low self-esteem, adrift about her place in the world & easily backs down when life gets rough. She has a close bond with her mother Mina (Sylvia Sanchez), a single mother who raised Abby on her own while cooking & managing an Italian restaurant called Mama Mina with her best friend Neila (Arlene Muhlach). Mina is always there to support & protect Abby at all costs, even if Abby pushes her away at times. Meanwhile, Neila’s son Nico (Diego Loyzaga) is Abby’s best friend who hides his true feelings for her. Unfortunately, he gets upstaged by Zak (Jameson Blake), the singer of a famous band Abby is a huge fan of. Everything seems normal, but it turns out Mina is trying to hide her ovarian cancer from Abby until it couldn’t be shrugged off. She dies, leaving Abby even more depressed than usual, but with the help of her mother’s packages she prepared for Abby before her death, she might just find her calling in this world.

But the movie doesn’t tell this story in a straightforward manner. It kills off Mina early in the film & jumps into the future, where Abby is still reeling from her mother’s death, the end of her relationship with Zak due to his philandering, & the dire straits Mama Mina is in thanks to the loss of her mother’s cooking. It jumps back & forth from the past & present to fill in the gaps. 

It’s an audacious gambit that unfortunately doesn’t work. It is executed sloppily, at times turning the movie into a series of dramatic moments without building up to it. It also pushes Abby’s worsening dour outlook into the spotlight, without providing new insights about her character or her mother. It also flattens Abby’s rocky relationship with Zak into hacky territory, since it jumps far too ahead without giving us reasons to care. And since the movie pits Abby’s lingering feelings for Zak & her blossoming feelings for Nico as the basis of a love triangle, it removes any tension that would’ve served as one of the movie’s main conflicts. There’s also a subplot involving Abby’s grandmother that pops up out of nowhere in the climax. The messy execution of the film’s novel narrative makes it harder for its emotional moments to land.

Thankfully, the movie redeems itself through the tender relationship between Abby & Mina. It is sweet & infectious, as the movie reveals the love & affection they have for each other, even if they get on each other’s nerves. It’s also anchored with great performances from the main duo. Sylvia Sanchez showing Mina’s sweetness, understanding, & strength amidst all her problems. Sofia Andres gets bogged down by Abby’s repetitive downward spiral & still makes it count, but she shines when Abby shares touching moments with Mina. Even she livens up her Mina’s tired romantic subplot, especially since her chemistry with Diego Loyzaga is electric. There are also some creative shots & energetic long takes that liven up the movie.

But it just highlights how close the movie was in making something special. Mama’s Girl is deeply flawed, but it’s clearly trying to do something different & do justice to its heartwarming material. While it failed, its ambition, sincerity & commitment to showing the ups & downs of Abby & Mina, even after death, comes through that it’s easy to overlook its flaws. It may not be enough to make a great movie, but it can make for a decent one.

Metro Manila Film Festival 2017: Ang Larawan is a Stirring Eulogy for Old Manila

TL;DR: Ang Larawan is a stirring eulogy to Old Manila in the face of desperate times.

Ang Larawan (The Portrait) has a legacy of greatness behind its creation. It is based  on A Portrait of the Artist as Filipino, a widely acclaimed Filipino play written in English by National Artist Nick Joaquin, which was then adapted into a classic movie by National Artist Lamberto V. Avellana. The play itself was turned into a musical called Larawan, The Musical with National Artist Rolando Tinio writing the libretto, famed musician & composer Ryan Cayabyab penning the music, & National Artist Salvador Bernal designing the set.

Ang Larawan follows its forebearer’s footsteps. As an adaptation of Larawan, The Musical, not only does it survive its transition from stage to film, it’s a moving tribute to an old way of Filipino life during the dawn of World War II that’s as masterful as its previous incarnations.


Set during the dawn of World War II, Candida (Joanna Ampil) & Paula (Rachel Alejandro) are daughters of Don Lorenzo Marasigan, a widely renowned painter whose fame & wealth allowed them to enjoy the good life. Their father centered his children’s lives around art & his ideals when they were young, while hosting parties with other members of the Filipino elite.

Alas, it wasn’t meant to last. Both Candida & Paula are unmarried, living with their father who hasn’t produced a single painting in years, putting them in financial trouble. They don’t have enough money to pay their bills or buy necessities that they have to rely on their brother Manolo (Nonie Buencamino) & sister Pepang (Menchu Lauchengco-Yao) for their expenses. They even opened up one of their rooms to Tony Javier (Paulo Avelino), a two-bit vaudeville piano player with big dreams. But after their father had an accident, he drew a impressive painting for Candida & Paula & turned himself into a recluse. Word got around about their father’s latest masterpiece & their house is now bombarded by onlookers, art critics, & potential buyers. The painting might be their way out of their problems, but neither Candida nor Paula are willing to sell their father’s precious painting to anyone; not even to Tony, who became a middleman to an American buyer willing to buy for a huge amount of money. However, their increasing desperation & the looming war might just push them otherwise.


At a first glance, setting up the conflict as whether two people are willing to risk their survival for a painting may not sound compelling for the big screen, but Ang Larawan gives us reasons to care. The family dynamic of the Marasigans is fascinating in itself & the movie leans heavily into it. Don Marasigan taught his children about his principles about art & culture & they either embraced it fully or rejected in tiny or huge ways, & now we’re seeing the fallout from their decisions. It’s reflected in the different ways they interpret their father’s latest painting, as they see their flaws & insecurities gawked & admired by the world at large. As different members of the Filipino society seek out this painting, their presence adds more dimensions to the movie. Their appearance is used to examine colonial Filipino society from different angles, especially those from a privileged background, & ask what does it mean to hold onto your values at a time or compromising them for a different one, when it’s easier to throw them away altogether to endure a world on the verge of collapse. It’s the old “art vs. commerce” & “integrity vs. prosperity” debate with much higher stakes, & while the conclusions the movie ends up with is a bit simplistic, it’s already emotionally involving since its discussions of art & integrity have been imbued by the human foibles of the Marasigans & the people surrounding them.

Especially when it’s done through song. The movie uses the same libretto & compositions from Larawan, The Musical, with the help of Ryan Cayabyab as the film’s musical director & the ABS-CBN Philharmonic Orchestra performing the score, & the jump to the big screen isn’t without its flaws. At times, it feels too claustrophobic & it doesn’t take more advantage of the freedom to play around in a three-dimensional space. The transition from one act to another can be stiff & awkward, but would play better with an actual curtain drop. It’s still heavily indebted to its theatrical roots, often to a fault.


But it’s the same quality that makes it excellent. The movie consists of people belting out their emotions through the gorgeous music delivered by Ryan Cayabyab & the ABS-CBN Philharmonic Orchestra, buoyed from great performances from the rest of the cast. It’s not subtle, but it goes straight for your heart, grabbing it & never letting go, without any pretense about its intentions. Not too mention this movie is filled with ridiculous amount of talent. Joanna Ampil deservedly won Best Actress for her role, & it’s no accident. Her Candida is fierce, stubborn, & often on the verge of breakdown, whose emotions swirl & shift thanks to their horrible circumstances. The only other worthy performer for the same award would Rachel Alejandro as Paula, who’s more soft-spoken & reserved yet equally captivating. Together, they bounce off & balance each other’s energies that’s arresting to watch. And this might be Paulo Avelino’s first musical role, he acquits himself nicely as the scrappy, charismatic Tony, who tries to sweep Paula off her feet to gain her favor. We’re barely even mentioning the likes of highly talented actors like Nanette Inventor, Noel Trinidad, Zsa Zsa Padilla, Sandino Martin, Menchu Launchengco-Yulo, Nonie Buencamino & more.

All of them fully realize the struggles of the people with the knowledge that Filipino society as they know it is about to end. Even so, Ang Larawan is a moving farewell to that era, one that speaks to our better judgment in the face of so much uncertainty & destruction. The world might soon be turned upside down due to chaos & violence, but it might be better to confront it with our integrity intact.