Movie Review: Ang Pambansang Third Wheel Charges Forward With Charm But Doesn’t Know When to Stop

TL;DR: Ang Pambansang Third Wheel (The National Third Wheel) charges forward with charm & energy, but that proves to be its greatest strength & weakness.

Trina (Yassi Pressman) has never had it easy when it comes to love. She’s the eternal third wheel; cheated on by men multiple times & constantly surrounded by her friends who have their own romantic relationships, as if rubbing her singlehood in her face. She finds hope when she meets the handsome Neo (Sam Milby), an aspiring applicant in the marketing agency she works for. She’s immediately smitten to his charms, but they don’t get along easily due to her stubborn nature & her bitter view of relationships. Once she starts to open up, they become a couple; with Trina celebrating that she’s finally stopped being the third wheel. That celebration is short-lived when Neo reveals that he has a son Murphy (Alonzo Muhlach) from his ex-girlfriend Monica (Sam Pinto). At first, she’s mad that Neo didn’t reveal he has a son & scared at the prospect of becoming a stepmom, but once she decides to continue dating Neo, she finds herself trying to adapt to Neo’s complicated family arrangement.

What makes Ang Pambansang Third Wheel (The National Third Wheel) notable is its pacing. It zips by with the help of Trina’s narration; allowing her to comment about the events unfolding in her life, & at times, cut away to her fervent imagination. It makes for a bouncy, energetic movie that gives life to well-worn tropes, & pushes the movie towards more interesting material; exploring the various ways one can be a third wheel & the different dynamics of a separated family. Unfortunately, it doesn’t know when to stop. It’s apparent in the latter half, where it continues to push forward without giving it time to breathe. While it makes a bit of thematic sense & it never forces its characters to act unnaturally, it feels like the movie contorted itself towards its inevitable conclusion.

Thankfully, the cast keeps it from spinning out of control. This is a total showcase for Yassi Pressman, whose bubbly energy & prickly nature doesn’t belie how stranded she is when trying to ingratiate to Neo’s family. Sam Milby isn’t just here to display his charm & his beautifully sculpted abs either. He gets to shine as a man trying to atone for his past mistakes, but finds himself stuck between two priorities. Sam Pinto isn’t painted as Neo’s spurned, vengeful ex, but as a smart, responsible single mother who finally gets a shot at achieving her dreams. And while Al Tantay gets an undercooked subplot, he’s a warm presence as Trina’s father, & their paternal pairing is the best relationship in the movie. It’s not a slight against the movie nor its charming leads, but their loving, supportive relationship is endearing & provides the movie a fascinating way to view Trina’s circumstances.; especially when it leans into this by the end. This would’ve helped it resonate more, but Ang Pambansang Third Wheel has moved so fast at that point that it ends up as a fizzy confection with fascinating layers, never coalescing into a satisfying whole.

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Metro Manila Film Festival 2017: Deadma Walking Finds Heart & Humor in the Face of Death

TL;DR: Even with its cheap gay jokes & a rushed ending, Deadma Walking finds the heart & humor in its ridiculous premise.

Dark comedies about death are tricky to pull off. It’s a depressing topic that can be callous or insensitive if handled incorrectly, but if done right, it can shine a light on our foibles to cope at one of the few things that make us human. Death is no laughing matter, but it’s easier to laugh in the face of our demise. Why shouldn’t we? We’re all going to die anyway.

In that respect, Deadma Walking succeeds. It’s a hilarious farce that grows even more absurd until the very end, without ignoring the sweet relationship at the heart of the movie.

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Jon (Joross Gamboa) is the rich gay son of a famous beauty queen who finds out he is terminally ill. Instead of dealing with the inescapable awareness of death like a normal person, he schemes with his flamboyant gay best friend Mark (Edgar Allan Guzman), a talented theater actor, to fake his own death & set up his own funeral while he’s still alive, since he wants people to remember him at his best & to see how his life would be celebrated; unlike her mother whose photos during her final days were spread all over the news, eclipsing who she was at her prime. Mark is initially hesitant, because it is an insane plan, but once he warms up to the idea, he becomes the host to an extravagant funeral dedicated to his best friend. Of course, complications arise, especially once her estranged sister returns to the Philippines.

But before we even get to the funeral, the movie takes its time to reveal the lives of Jon & Mark & their relationship as best friends. It’s a smart move, since it sets up the emotional foundation of the movie that makes it easier to buy into its crazy premise, even as the funeral becomes more absurd by the day. Joross Gamboa & Edgar Allan Guzman are great as best friends who will stick together through thick & thin. Edgar Allan Guzman has the flashier performance, due to Mark’s more energetic personality, while Joross Gamboa gives Jon a hint of sadness that shows how worried he is about his impending death.

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Yet, it’s never depressing because the movie is ridiculously funny. The crazy premise allows it to come up with a bunch of ridiculous gags & an excuse for surprising cameos. Oddly enough, there are times where it uses the leads’ sexuality as a punchline, finding ways to make them act as stereotypical flamboyant gays at the sight of handsome, muscular men. Jokes like this ruin what could’ve a purely absurd farce, but the deep characterizations & silly jokes outweigh them.

By the movie’s end, it hones exactly what the movie is about, even if it resolves a conflict too neatly. It’s a tribute to the strong bond between two people who deeply care & love each other, even in the face of death. If you’re going to die sooner, you might as well have your best friend with you by your side.

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Pista ng Pelikulang Pilipino 2017: Down Syndrome is Tackled with Grace in the Heartwarming Star na si Van Damme Stallone

TL;DR While it gets too sweet & aspirational by the third act, Star na si Van Damme Stallone is a funny, heartwarming movie that handles Down Syndrome with the levity & subtlety it deserves.

Down syndrome is a condition misunderstood by majority of the public. People who have Down syndrome are mostly mocked or ostracized by society. It doesn’t help that representation for people with Down syndrome is mostly nil.

Star na si Van Damme Stallone (Van Damme Stallone is Now a Star) proves it shouldn’t be that way. This is an excellent movie that gives people with Down syndrome & their families a chance in the spotlight, & have their stories told.

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Nadia (Candy Pangilinan) is a single parent who has to make ends meet to raise her two children Tano & Van Damme Stallone (who is given the nickname Vanvan), the latter of which has Down syndrome. The movie follows the family’s struggles & victories, as Nadia guides her children to adulthood, while Vanvan tries to achieve his dream to be an actor.

The best thing about the movie is it takes pains in showing how hard it can be to raise a child with Down syndrome without sugarcoating or overplaying the struggle or fears of every parent & family member. It focuses on the small, intimate moments, like Nadia worrying about your Vanvan’s future, Tano letting Vanvan get the lead role in a play, or the family defending Vanvan from bullies. It’s not afraid to go dark either, with one of the movie’s memorable moments involve Nadia doing something horrible to escape her life, but backing away at the last moment, quickly apologizing to Vanvan. It already knows that taking care of someone with Down syndrome is compelling enough on its own.

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Although this movie isn’t as dour as it sounds. This is a sweet & hilarious movie, & is better for it. Vanvan is surrounded by people who love & support him outside their main family, like his grade school teacher & her mother’s best friend Cecille (Sarah Brakensiek) & his uncle Jim (Richard Noson). It is partly aspirational, but it never loses its unsparing, realistic approach. There are jokes, but none are there to make Vanvan the butt of it. It makes for a charming movie, even as it deals with a topic like Down syndrome.

More importantly, Vanvan is depicted as an actual human. He’s not a never-ending obstacle for his family, a prop to emphasize how good his family is, nor an unlimited supply of goodness. Vanvan has wants, needs, strengths & flaws. The movie even indulges in bits of whimsy, taking us into Vanvan’s mind in an effort to show us who he is.

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It helps that the actors they chose to play Vanvan are excellent; both of which have Down syndrome as well. Jadford Dilanco & Paolo Pingol play young & old Van Damme respectively, & they both capture his playful, childlike innocence & his pricklier side. But the most surprising & outstanding performance has to be from Candy Pangilinan. She shows us the internal struggle of a single parent with a subtle, nuanced performance. It’s not showy, but it fits the movie’s mood & story.

The movie does get too sweet & indulge in unearned wish fulfillment by the third act. It tries its best to give everyone a happy ending, one of which involves a cameo appearance from Jasmine Curtis-Smith. It doesn’t matter, since it’s still absorbing by the end. Besides, Star na si Van Damme Stallone is the kind of sincere, good-natured family movie that rarely gets made anymore & it tackles the subject of Down syndrome with the delicate touch it deserves.