Pista ng Pelikulang Pilipino 2017: Bar Boys Get a Passing Grade

TL;DR: At its best, Bar Boys captures the rich tapestry of college life through the unique lens of law school.

The titular Bar Boys are far from the drunk slackers you’d expect them to be. It refers to the four close friends who love hang out & play DOTA on internet cafes. All of them applied in the same law school, but only three of them were accepted. Erik (Carlo Aquino) struggles early on once he enters law school, which he feels guilty about since his father works very hard as a security guard just so he could study. Torran (Rocco Nacino) is doing much better than Eric, but he’s also alloting some of his time at a fraternity for the connections it could bring. Chris (Enzo Pineda) is a studious, intelligent man who comes from a rich family & receives good grades. But his life is far from perfect: he’s trying to juggle his studies, his relationship with his girlfriend, & trying to hide said relationship from his controlling father who wants him to study in America. The only one who didn’t make it is Joshua (Kean Cipirano), who only applied for law school to please his parents & would rather use this opportunity to become an actor.

From there, it follows Erik, Torran & Chris as they try their best to survive law school without tearing each other apart, especially since only few students get to graduate with a law degree. It does this by mixing the internal struggles of the main ensemble & broad, funny yet relatable moments familiar to those who went to college, or even studied; from the old student that easily stands out, terrifying professors, and trying your best not to get called on by the aforementioned professors during recitation. It’s similar to other nostalgic coming-of-age movies such as Bagets, but the uniqueness of its milieu & its specificity makes its stand out. The approach gives it a chance to flesh out the world of law school & its inhabitants; it doesn’t shy away from the more violent impulses of fraternities either. At its best, these two elements are combined with ease & reveal the rich tapestry of being a law student, but at its worst, it slows down an overstuffed movie & takes our attention away from the movie’s more interesting stories.

But the main ensemble keeps the whole movie from spinning in multiple directions. All of them are excellent, especially Carlo Aquino as the striving underachiever who slowly becomes jealous of his friends. The most memorable role comes from Odette Khan as the strict yet caring Justice Hernandez, who understands more than anyone that the path to becoming a lawyer is stressful, because of the responsibility they will yield in the future. Bar Boys is cognizant of this, even if they are faced with so much obstacles. Whatever happens, their friendship will carry them onto graduation & beyond.

Metro Manila Film Festival 2017: All of You Focuses Too Much on the Rut

TL;DR: All of You could’ve been a layered examination of cohabitation or a slow breakdown of a mismatched couple, but it gets too dour & repetitive to make it work.

Two years after breaking off with her fiance, Gab (Jennylyn Mercado) tries online dating for the first time while researching for a business venture in Taiwan. She matches up with Gabby (Derek Ramsey), a businessman on vacation who co-owns a bar called “Neverland” with his friends. They’re both attracted to each other & quickly hit it off after their first date, continuing to see each other in the Philippines for months. When Gabby asked Gab to move with him – even though their relationship is so young they’ve only been together for less than a year – she agrees, but what they didn’t expect is how living together would be harder than they thought.

This isn’t unfamiliar territory for Dan Villegas, who continues to mine mature stories out of couples trying to navigate the modern world without breaking themselves apart. It starts out with so much promise, with Dan Villegas, Melissa Mae Chua, & Carl Chavez showing off their ability to create realistic, engaging dialogue between two people falling in love. As usual, Jennylyn Mercado & Derek Ramsey are irresistible as a couple, whose romantic sparks just fly off the screen, but this time, they have more intimate scenes compared to their previous movie English Only, Please that further their bond.

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But once they start living together, the movie slowly reveals how incompatible they are for each other, their personalities & habits clashing frequently. This would’ve made for a fascinating romantic drama about the pleasures & pitfalls of cohabitation, but the movie slightly shifts its focus at how their inability to compromise & match their priorities will slowly erode whatever love they have for each other. The movie presents this descent with the same grounded tone Villegas is known for. Jennylyn Mercado & Derek Ramsey get a chance to stretch their acting chops as a couple trying to hold onto their relationship, even as their frustrations get the better of them. And throughout the movie, Dexter dela Peña’s simple yet eye-catching compositions shine through.

Unfortunately, it focuses too much on the descent. The whole movie turns into a bleak look at the main couple, without offering any respite from the doom & gloom, that whatever pleasures or insights that can be gleamed are drowned by its bitter, repetitive tone. Not too mention it ends on a false, abrupt note that, while plausible, feels like it shrugged off everything that happened during their relationship since we weren’t privy to the changes that happened leading up to it & it’s a betrayal of what the movie is about: love just isn’t enough to make a relationship work. Just like its central couple, the individual elements surrounding All of You could’ve made it great, but it just doesn’t add up to a satisfying whole.

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