A Silent Voice Probes the Effects of Teenage Bullying Briskly with Mixed Results

TL;DR: While it may provide insightful commentary on the effects of teenage bullying, the amount of plot it has to unspool somewhat undercuts its intentions.

The latest anime movie to reach Philippine shores isn’t the straightforward romantic melodrama its local poster suggests. This is a movie attuned to the complexities of teenage friendships, the effects of bullying, & the struggles of the hearing impaired. It may not be the adorable tearjerker people are expecting, but it is a more rewarding watch.

Adapted from an award-winning manga, it tells the story of Shoya Ishida, a young boy who bullied Shoko Nishimiya, a deaf girl who just transferred into their school, alongside his friends to various degrees when he was in elementary. But when he ended up ratting out his behavior towards his friends, he becomes ostracized & bullied as well. Now that he’s in high school, he’s still an outcast. The pain & loneliness he feels causes him to make amends to his mother he troubled her when he was a kid & to apologize to Shoko before he commits suicide. However, when his plan fell apart, he decides to befriend her anyway, causing the people around Shoya & Shoko to explore what happened in the past in order to move forward.

The movie deals with heavy themes, but it’s neither soapy nor miserablist in the slightest. It’s a languid, tranquil movie intent on capturing the smallest details to create the biggest emotional impact; often using unbalanced compositions to emphasize the character’s isolation from his/her environment. Since this is made by Kyoto Animation, this is brought to life with beautiful, realistic backgrounds full of bright colors. The characters are animated with less realism, opting to emphasize their emotions. Whenever these characters smile, cry or just feel something, you can watch every movement of their face & body. Their eyes widen with glee, their bodies tremble when they are shaken & you can even see their teardrops falling from their eyes in such ridiculous detail.There are also moments of humor sprinkled throughout the movie; one of which is a smash cut that revolves around an innocuous reveal. Everything happens to try exploring its characters’ humanity while trying to dissect the effects of bullying Shoko, from Shoko & her family, the instigators, & those who stood by as it happened.

“Try” is the operative word there, because while it is sincere in its aims, adapting the whole story into a movie is not a good idea. It is crammed with so much plot that the movie is forced to either introduce it without giving those who have read the manga to care, rush these developments, or abruptly end it for the next one; which is counter-intuitive to its slow pacing. It also forces the movie to focus mostly on Shoya, nearly turning it into a movie about a guy redeeming for his previous sins, which gives us less time to spend on everyone, especially the deaf girl at the center of the story. The movie is aware that Shoyo might be trying to flatter himself, but it still doesn’t change the fact that the movie’s approach undercuts a lot of character development. It really would’ve been better as a two-hour anime.

Instead, what we have is a recap movie to a non-existing excellent season of anime. It still works thanks to its insights & attention to detail making sure that every emotional beat lands most of the time, but it’s hard not to think how great it would’ve been if we had been given more time to watch these characters facing up to the choices they’ve made in the past. Unfortunately, we don’t live in that universe, but at least we got a good movie from the manga here.

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